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BAMBOO BREEZES 

Uf-NAVY YARD CAVITE-PI- 

VCI . XIV— NO. IS I I II A> . JUNE 7. 1940 



At 10:35 A.M., Wednesday. June 5th, the 
Commanding General. Philippine Department, 
Major General George Gruenert, USA., acconv 
panied by his Aide, Lieutenant George R. 
Gruenert, USA., called officially on Rear Ad' 
miral J. M. Smeallic, USN., Commandant, Six* 


t^enth Naval District. 

Usual honors were rendered Major General 
Gruenert immediately upon his arrival. After 
a brief visit with the Commandant and his 
staff, the Commanding General of the Philip' 
pine Department, received a thirteen'gun salute. 


OFFICER CHANGES 

Incoming 

Lieutenant Commander H. H. Taylor, USN, 
from USS ARGONNE via SS President Pierce 
arriving about June 15th, accompanied by Mrs. 
laylor. their son and two daughters. Will be 
assigned duty upon reporting. 

* 

Lieutenant Leonard V. Duffy, USN, from 
duly as Commanding Officer, USS NAPA, to 
District. Reported June 4th, 1940. Family in 
United States. 

* 

Outgoing 

Commander Jose A. Perez (MC) USN, 
detached U. S. Naval Hospital, Canacao, P. I., 
on June 9th, 1940. Sailing SS President Pierce 
on June 10th for China where he will report to 
Commander Yangtze Patrol for duty as Patrol 
Medical Officer. Mrs. Perez and their son, Raul, 
are accompanying Commander Perez in the 
Pierce. * r 

* 

Lieutenant Commander Fritz C. Nyland 
(CEC) USN, detached from duty in the District 
as District Public Works Officer, sailed for 
United States in SS President Cleveland, family- 
accompanying him. Upon arrival in United 
states he will report for duty in Naval Aircraft 
Factory, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Lieutenant (,g) Adolph F. Benscheidt, 
(CEC) USN, detached may 31st, sailed June 
1st in SS President Cleveland for United States 
where he will report to the Commandant, 
Thirteenth Naval District for duty in Puget 
Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton Washington. Mrs. 
Benscheidt accompanied him. 


SPECIAL MOVIES!!! 

7:00 P.M. Naval Hospital Theatre 
8:00 P.M. Receiving Station Theatre. 

PROGRAMS : 

June 11, 1940 

ABRAHAM LINCOLN IN ILLINOIS 
June 25, 1940 

SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON 

July 9, 1940 
PINNOCHIO 

ADMISSIOH : 

Either ^Show P0.15 




BAMBOO BREEZES 





EXTEKTAIMVIEXT 

by your favorite 

* * * * Queenie & David 

in Hawaiian Songs 

★ ★ ★ ★ .Peggy da Silva 

with her accordion 

★ Fely * 

in novelty dances 
“Something 
Doing 

Every Minute” 


Dine, wine and be mer- 
ry. You’ll find your 
friends here amidst an 
atmosphere you’ll en- 
joy. 

MIDNIGHT 
FOOD SPECIALS 
SUNRISE 

BREAKFAST DANCE 


ORIENTAL 


T 


CM*/ 


GRILL 


In the New Steinies 

^an iHuuu'l 
Hale Pilsrn 





the grand old brew^- 
Invigorating^- 
Refreshing*— 
the ideal 
thirst-quencher 

24 Steinies in the new handy to handle 
package Obtainable at the 

SAN MIGUEL BREWERY BODEGA 

Caridad, Cavite 



Inter-Island Shipping Service 

Compania Maritima 

IOQ Juan Luna. Manila 
Insurance and Bonds 

MANILA COMPANIA DE SEGUROS 

1 OQ Juan I vima. Mh.hIh 
Ship Chandlery 

Varadero de Manila 

Canacao. Cavite 

GENERAL MANAGERS: 

FERNANDEZ HEKMANOS, Inc. 

109 Juan Luna Telephone 14-98-24 



3 


June 7 9 194(f 

ADMIRAL SMEALLIE’S 
MEMORIAL DAY ADDRESS 

It is human nature to take for granted incid- 
ents and events that occur frequently, experien- 
ces often encountered, magnificent views seen 
daily. Just so with our holidays — we are in- 
clined to accept them simply as dates in the 
round of the year. With the exception, per- 
haps, of Christmas, there is seldom a great deal 
of thought given by most of us to the back- 
ground and significance of the days themselves 
and their messages for the present. 

For the past seventy-five years, citizens and 
soldiers have assembled in cemeteries on May 
30, a.nd there decorated the graves of the mili- 
tary dead. This custom originated during the 
latter days of the Civil War and was formally 
adopted, as just read to you by General Logan. 
At first known as Decoration Day, the Grand 
Army of the Republic soon recommended that 
it be termed, instead, Memorial Day — and that 
is now its recognized designation. Intended at 
its inception to apply only to the Civil War 
dead, it now embraces the veterans of all wars 
and service men in general. 

The act of commemorating the exploits of 
those who have died in battle is of ancient origin. 
Military men from the earliest times have set 
aside a day or a period as an occasion for pay- 
ing tribute to their departed comrades. Ceno- 
taphs, literally, empty tombs, have been erected 
to become central symbolical points where the 
people could meet to honor those who die for 
their country but whose bodies lie elsewhere, 
usually on foreign soil. 

In the services this morning, however, we are 
not assembled at a symbolic monument — we 
stand among their very graves. This gives us 
a more personal association and union with 
those of the services who have answered “taps” 
for the last time. We do them honor whether 
their last days were spent in uniform or with 
those uniforms honorably laid aside. 

Medical men assert that the human body un- 
dergoes a complete change every seven years. 
That is to say, at the end of any seven year 
period there is not a single cell of the body 
that is physically the same as the corresponding 
cell at the beginning of that period. But the 
personality, spirit and general character has per- 
sisted; the external form and outward appear- 
ance has remained essentially the same. 

In this same fashion the character of the arm- 
ed services of the nation perists. The individ- 
uals composing the organization change as the 
years go by. They die or they transfer to other 
activities, but the spirit of the organization lives 
on. Those who in the past, have worn 

r ' 

Caridad’s Famous Old 

MANGO INN 

COOL - DELIGHTFUL - RESTFUL 


BARBECUE 

PARTIES 


the same coth, sworn the same oath, marched 
the same trails, or sailed the same seas are still 
essentially members of our organization — that 
greater organization which includes those who 
have died as well as those of us who still live. 

The mental linking, the act of communion 
between these two branches, separated only by 
the Great Divide should appropriately occur 
once a year on Memorial Day. That is the sig- 
nificance of the day itself. 

To extol the past exploits, to pay tribute to 
our departed comrades who have sailed for the 
last time on the Great Ship is but the beginning 
of our obligations and our responsibilities. 
President Lincoln in his deathless Gettysburg 
Address, delivered at the dedication of the mili- 
tary cemetery on that battlefiled, set forth the 
course of action to be followed not only by 
those who were fortunate enough to be his 
hearers on that day but as a guide for ail future 
assemblies of a similar nature. 

“It is rather for us to be here dedicated to 
the great task remaining before us; that we 
here highly resolve that these dead shall not 
have died in vain; and that government of the 
people, by the people and for the people shall 
not perish from the earth.” 

Those whom we honor today contributed 
their share, some large some small, to our coun- 
try’s present greatness and to the personal well 
being of everyone of us. Without these contri- 
butions who can say what state of slavery or 
subjugation might not be our present lot. Wc 
are not at war but there are wars in almost 
every quarter of the earth. It is like living in a 
community where a deadly pestilence is abroad, 
when one can never be sure that any particular 
individual is immune. In these years no one 
can foretell the future, even from day to day. 

What then is the practical measure of our 
self dedication? It seems to me to be a deter- 
mination to face the future with courage, moral 
courage as well as physical courage. Mr. Roger 
Babson recently wrote, “We need a spiritual 
awakening which will emphasize that courage is 
the only security and that progress comes only 
through sacrifice/ 

In closing, I wish to quote from an address of 
our President delivered just a few days ago: 
“Our task is plain. Our defenses must be 
invulnerable. But defense cannot be static. 
It must grow and change from day to day. It 
must be dynamic and flexible, an expression 
of the vital forces of the nation and the 
nation’s resolute will to meet whatever chal- 
lenge the future may hold.” 

That seems to be the immediate task. The 
purpose — That these dead shall not have 
died in vain. 


FREE delivery service!! 
The Best Bread in Town 
at P0.16 a loaf. 

Fresh oven baked and strictly 
home made. 

ROOMS and BOARD 

CHEFOO RESTAURANT 

12 XIII Martires St., Cavite 


MORE DISTRICT DANCES 

Since the recently held District Dance for 
Enlisted personnel met with such fine success, 
it has been proposed that such affairs be held 
more often. In keeping with this proposal, the 
following plan will be followed. It is planned 
to have two such dances per month. The 
Navy Yard Tennis courts will be prepared; the 
orchestra will be on hand and all those who 
desire to spend an evening at these dances are 
welcome and privileged to come. 

The first of these dances is scheduled for 
Friday night, June 21st, from 8:30 until mid- 
night. No refreshments will be served, but the 
Ship’s Service will have refreshments for sale 
for those who desire them. The surface of the 
court will be prepared and the orchestra will 
be on hand. Those who desire to form small 
dance parties may do so or else come and join 
in the general fun. 

In the event of rain on these nights, the or- 
chestra will be moved to the Ship’s Service Re- 
staurant where the dance will be held. 

There will be little effort made in promotion 
of these dances. The Captain of the Yard, the 
District Chaplain and others will gladly assist in 
any way possible in making these dances suc- 
cessful. Their success, finally, will depend on 
the Enlisted personnel who like such parties 
and will do their part in putting them over. 
Any ideas may be discussed with the District 
Chaplain who will gladly cooperate in carry- 
ing them out. Individuals are invited to dis- 
cuss these proposed dances with the Chaplain. 
These dances are for the Enlisted personnel and 
it will be up to the Enlisted personnel, by their 
own initiative, to make them a success. If any 
group is desirous of injecting any novelties or 
special features into the dance they may do so. 

REMEMBER— DANCE NIGHT— FRIDAY, 
JUNE 21ST. 

o 

OFFICERS CLUB NOTICE 

Tuesday June 11, 1940 — 5PM to 7PM 
COCKTAIL PARTY for the visiting Officers 
of VP 26 

Let’s show these Airmen our Tropical Hos- 
pitality. 

Note: It will be necessary to make a charge of 

One Peso per person to help pay part of the 

expenses. 

There are NO Dinner Dances scheduled for 
the month of June. 

BUT: 

Hold everything for Saturday night, June 
22nd. 


RUSSIAN RESTAURANT 

“RENAISSANC E ’ 

The only place for real 
Russian Dishes 

BEEF STROGANOFF — CHICKEN 
A LA KIEVE — BORSH — PIL1- 
MINY and Assorted Appetizing 
Russian ZAKUSSKA. 

Ice Cold Vodka — Cold Beer 
222 Isaac Peral Ermita, Manila i 

Tel. 5-40-51 


ICE-COLD 

STEINIES 


4 


BAMBOO BREEZES 


DISTRICT NEWS NOTES 

Marine Barracks News Items 

We regret to report that the Commanding 
Officer, Lieut. Colonel Wynn, has been a 
patient in the U. S. Naval Hospital at Canacao 
for the past few days. The indications thus for 
are that the Colonel's illness is not of too 
serious a nature and that he will be back with 
us again within a very short time. 

* 

Orders have been received for Captain Kirk’s 
transfer to the States via the President Coolidge 
sailing from Manila at the end of this’ month. 
Captain Kirk's present tour of duty on the Asia* 
tic station includes time in North China, the 
Marine Barracks, Olongapo on temporary and 
regular duty and winds up with duty at this 
post. His family preceded him to the States 
several months ago. 

That patch which Private Jeffers of the local 
garage force has been wearing over his nose for 
the past few days was definitely acquired in line 
of duty and bears no relationship to payday or 
Dreamland what'SO'Over. He merely tried to 
support a truck spring with his nose after with' 
drawing the shackle bolt! 

ifc % 

Industrial Dept. 

The subject for the sketch this week will be 
Lt. (jg) C. J. Espey (CEC), USN, a new meni' 
ber of the Public Works Division staff. 

Lt. Espey was born in Portland, Oregon, on 
3 February, 1912. From 1918 to 1928 he at' 
tended Grade and High Schools in Woodburn, 
Oregon, going on to Columbia University, Port' 
land, Oregon, in the latter year. In 1929 Lt. 
Espey entered the University of Oregon, gra' 
duating in 1933 with the degree of Bachelor 
of Science. Taking postgraduate work at Ore' 
gon State College in 1935 Lt. Espey earned 
his Master’s degree in ’36. 

In 1938 Lt. Espey accepted a commission in 
the Civil Engineer Corps of the Navy and was 
assigned duty at the Bremerton Yard as As' 
sistant Outside Superintendent. Remaining 
there but a year he went on, in 1939, to the 
Naval Air Station, Seattle, Wash., as Public 
Works Officer and Assistant Project Manager. 

In May of this year Lt. Espey arrived at 
Cavite as relief of Lt. Benscheidt (CEC) USN. 

Mrs. Espey is accompanying Lt. Espey on the 
Station. 

$ $ $ 

Recreation Center 

Ladies and gentlemen of the BAMBOO 
BREEZES audience, it is a real pleasure to in' 
troduce to you the Civilian Manager of the 
Ship’s Service Department — Mr. A. M. Weems. 
Last Monday, June 3rd, Mr. Weems joined the 
Ship’s Service Department as assistant to Lieut' 
enant R. H. G. Johnson, USN, the Officerin' 
Charge, and in taking up his new duties here 
he has no feeling of strangeness due to already 
having a host of friends stationed in the Dist' 
rict. 

Mr. Weems first made himself known to the 
District personnel when he brought the first 
real cow’s milk to the Navy Yard while repre' 


senting the United Dairies through their first 
dark days in the Islands and worked tirelessly 
in firmly cementing business relationship bet' 
ween Ship’s Service Stores and the new dairy. 
After seeing this mission reach a successful con' 
elusion, he severed his association with the dairy 
and accepted managership of the New Legaspi 
Gardens and he has held that position up until 
the time he accepted his present position. 

$ 

Now for a few facts about the H'pa Shac\. 
The construction of this native shack was ac' 
complished by natives who have had their know' 
ledge of this work handed down to them from 
generation to generation. With the exception 
of the metal used in connection with the instal' 
lation of lighting the shack is literally a hand' 
woven building! 

The posts or stanchions used in this T^ipa 
Shack appear worm eaten and deteriorated, hut, 
strange to state, this particular wood known as 
cacawati (hard wood) will stand up against time 
for a hundred or more years before deteriorat' 
ing! 

The thatch wor\ of the roof has been woven 
into place by hand. The palm leaf used for the 
roof is known as “nipa” (pronounced nee-pa) 
and gives this type of native shack its name — 
“ "Hipa Shac\”. 

The Ship’s Service Officer has already had 
the Shack partially decorated in keeping with 
its native theme and he plans additional ap' 
propriate decorations for accomplishment in the 
near future. 

The Nipa Shac\ has its own servidor — a find 
from Camp John Hay — He has already been 
dubbed, “’Hi pa Freddy ”) 

o 

Life’s greatest mystery is how cold hard cash 
can warm a girl’s heart so easily! 


Lucky Tailor 

23 Trece Martires, Cavite 
We “make to order” all kinds of 
uniforms and civilian clothing. 
We also have complete supply of 
officers & CPO’s Caps, shoulder 
straps, braids, buttons, cap devices, 
white hats, rating badges, ties, etc. 

AT REASONABLE PRICES 


DINE 

at the 

Ship’s Service Restaurant 

NAVY YARD — CAVITE 

Home made 
bread, pies and pastries. 
Very reasonable prices. 
Sanitary surroundings^- 
Well ventilated. 


1 


Apparently the soft ball team of the school 
is on the downhill grade. The local Cavite 
Cubs took the lead by a score of 10 to 3 last 
week. Saturday the school team gave the Ca' 
vite AlLStars a tough battle until the last of 
the seventh inning when, at that point, the tide 
turned in their favor and they scored four runs 
which gave them the lead of 8'4. Well, feh 
lows, the school can’t win all the time. Better 
luck in the next games. 

Monday, the school had a scheduled game 
with their “chief soft ball enemies’’ — the Clout' 
ers, but due to rain the game was caJled off. 
Don’t forget, Dr’s., this game is still counted 
on very much. 

The mornings seems to become much shorter 
since the school started a drill circuit. This is 
much more fun than just copying press. The 
messages which are sent are originated by the 
gang here and some of the mesg’s are anuiS' 
ing to receive. 

The District dance seemed to take some of 
the speed out of our speed operators; this evid' 
ently caused the class average to drop a bit last 
Friday. Don’t let it get you fellows. Let's 
bring up that average this week. 

Unfortunately the school will be unable to 
enter a bowling team in the District Bowling 
Tournament as the class will disband before the 
season gets fully underway and the following 
class will convene a bit too late for bowling 
participation. 

A few of the men have been taking advant' 
age of the “Night Tennis’’ courts. This is a 
fine way to spend a few leisure hours. The 
weather being much cooler at night should make 
more of the fellows take advantage of this. 

The editor of this column has been good nat' 
uredly notified to retract his statement made 
several weeks ago about the new dance “The 
Beast Hop.” It seems that “The Prof.’’ has 
derived a new name for his dance; better known 
at some of the local places as the “Beast Shuf' 
fie." Try it sometime, folks. 

o 

BOY SCOUTS 

As in the past years on Memorial Day, the 
Troop 4 of the Sixteenth Naval District turned 
out 100% to do their Daily Good Turn. The 
troop met the Yard 680 at the Hospital Dock 
and received the Flowers and Flags that had 
been sent over from Manila. These were used 
to Decorate the Graves in the National 
Cemetery. After decorating the Monument in 
the Canacao Hospital the Troop proceeded to 
the National Cemetery and decorated all graves 
there. During the Services the boys took up 
their various stations, some as ushers while 
other kept watch that children did not get noisy 
and they saw that flags were not removed from 
the graves. 

The Troop formed the Color Guard with 
Scout Geo. Guittard as Bugler. 



June 7, 1940 


5 


DISTRICT DANCE 
OUTSTANDING SUCCESS 


The District Dance, 
held on the tennis 
courts of the Navy 
Yard, Thursday even' 
ing, May 30th, ha^ 
been acclaimed the 
outstanding dance of 
all those previously 
held. 

The dance was scheduled to begin promptly 
at 8:30 P.M., but due to the unusual popular- 
ity of the Ship’s Service Department’s newest 
“refreshment center” — T he JS(|.'pa Shack , [ — guests 
did not get as far as the tennis courts until 9:00 
P.M., and later. More information concerning 
the Nipa Shack and its service is given under 
“Recreation Center” of the DISTRICT NEWS 



NOTES. 

“Bandy” Obero, the popular bandmaster of 
the Sixteenth Naval District, and his syncopators 
played for the occasion. They obligingly fulfilled 
the many requests of the guests for “Special 
Numbers”. The music was superb and greatly 
enjoyed by all. 

The designated committee and volunteer as' 
sistants made all arrangements for the dance and 
it was somewhat surprising when it was noticed 
that there was not a vacant “seat in the house” 
about 10:00 P.M.! Yes, the committee was just 
about ready to hang up the “S. R. O.” sign — 
slightly modified to “D. R. O.” (dancing room 
only). It was unnecessary, however, due to the 
fine cooperation of all persons present. The 
courts were well'filled with dancing couples and 
as the evening progressed “the old-fashioned 
family and barn-dance spirit” became evident. 

There was never a dull moment during the 
entire evening and the attendance was undoub- 
tedly “capacity”. By way of diversion from the 
usual set routine of most dances of this sort, a 
Hoboken version ofthe Paul Jones was partici- 
pated in to the great delight of both participants 
and on lookers. Although there were evidently 
many who had never danced a Paul Jones and 
the fact that the “Caller” was ceremoniously 
tackled during the dance, much fun was ex- 
perienced. Due to the spaciousness of the courts 
it was only natural that many were verging on 


fatigue near the completion of the cycle. Later, 
five good old Navy regulation brooms were 
brought to the middle of the courts and a 
“Broom Dance” was announced. The conductor 
of this dance certainly had no difficulty in ob- 
taining volunteers to accept the brooms! Again, 
due to the size of the courts, it was necessary 
to use one of Ship's Service Charlie's large cake 
tins and Obero's rhumba shaker-uppers to make 
enough noise to indicate the “drop the broom 
and grab a partner” signals! It is believed that 
this dance was thoroughly enjoyed by all and it 
is planned to present a reversed version of this 
dance when the next District affair is given. 
When the music ceased, the men who were hold- 
ing the brooms were requested to line up. They 
did this very obligingly and perhaps with a 
slight glint in their eyes seemingly asking the 
question, “Where’s the prize?” They were then 
requested to present arms with the brooms and 
slowly turn completely around in a goodfellow- 
ship salute to dancers and on lookers. Thanks 
for your good sportsmanship, fellows, but next 
time please don't waylay the dance conductor 
after the salute... brooms of such weight leave 
peculiar bluish marks on the flesh! 

During the course of the festivities, Charlie's 
caterers or servidors (check one) served delici- 
ous sandwiches, ice cream pies and soft drinks. 
The courtesy and cooperation of these boys was, 
as usual, above reproach. Even Bandy Obero 
admitted that the band received a goodly por- 
tion of the refreshments. . . unsolicited! 

Among the officer guests, Commander E. L. 
Gayhart was much in evidence by the fact that 
he DID NOT have his candid camera with him! 
Disappointment was clearly shown in his face 
when the jitterbuggers began warming up so it 
would be safe to wager that never again will he 
fail to carry his little “tells all” in his side 
pocket! 

Everybody was having such a. genuinely good 
time that the Duty Officer of the Yard, upon 
request from the Chaplain, extended the time 
limit for this gala occasion for one hour longer. 
About 12:45 P.M., the festivities were conclud- 
ed.. . everyone tired and happy... the conclu- 
sion of the District’s best party. A vote of 
thank is extended to Mr. Weatherman for hiding 
the key to the rain flood gates until an hour 
or so after everyone was safely home. 


BOY SCOUTS NOTES 

Due to the fact that Ensign Russel, the pres- 
ent Scout Master of the Cavite Troop (Troop 
4), is returning to the United States the troop 
will soon be without a Scout Master, therefore 
anyone who is interested in this type of activ- 
ity and willing to devote time to the Boy 
Scouts of the District Troop please contact the 
Chairman of the Troop Committee, Lieutenant 
Commander H. G. Davis, USN, telephones: 
Office— 213; home— 212. 

NEW ARRIVAL! 

Born to Bob and Mrs. Miller a daughter, 
Ann, at 5:40 A.M., Saturday, June 1st, 1940, 
in U. S. Naval Hospital, Cahacao, P. I. 

Miss Ann Miller put an eight pound ten- 
sion on the springs of the baby scales as the 
attending physician. Dr. Syslo, weighed her in. 

The proud father reports that both Ann 
and her mother are doing splcnd.dly. 

BAMBOO BREEZES joins in extending 
heartiest congratulations to the Miller family. 
o 

KINDERGARTEN OPENS 

Mrs. C. C. Aident has announced that Kin- 
dergarten will again be open on Monday, June 
10th. The Boy Scout Shack at Cahacao will, 
as usual, house the little tots this year, and it 
is requested that mothers bring their little ones 
to the kindergarten after 8:30 A.M. 

Mlrs. Aident’s home address is 28 P. Zamora, 
Cavite, P. I. 

o 

Joe: “I want to change my name, your 

Honor.” 

Judge: “What is your name?” 

Joe: “Joe Stinx.” 

Judge: “I don't blame you. What do you 

want to change it to?” 

Joe: “Charlie!” 

o 

We don’t know which is better — 'thinking of 
a clever crack in time to say it, or thinking of 
it in time not to say it. 

o 

Whatever trouble Adam had, 

No man in days of yore, 

Could say when Adam cracked a joke 
“I’ve heard that one before.” 




"feu $/nAAJ(ljaS L CORONAS 


AND 

RUBIANES 

CIGARETTES 

IN BAKEUTE- 
HAND PAINTED DESIGNS _ 


them at uoux Ships Sezi/ice 



6 


BAMBOO BREEZES 


SCHOOL NOTICE 

The Navy Graded School at Canacao will 
open June 10, at 8:00 A.M. 

Parents are requested to register pupils ai 
the Ship’s Service Store, Cavite, before June 
10. Registration is required for old and new 
pupils. 

Monday, June 10, at 8:00 A.M. : Tests for 
new pupils who expect to enter Grades IV, V, 
VI, VII, or VIII. Only pupils to take these 
tests need come to school. 

Tuesday, June 11, at 8:00 A.M.: Tests for 

new pupils who expect to enter Grades I, II. 
or III. Only pupils to take these tests need 
come to school. 

Wednesday, June 12: Regular classes begin. 
All pupils, old and new should report at 8:00 
A.M. School session for Grades I & II 8:00 
A.M. to 12:00 A.M. School session for 
Grades III to VIII 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. 

Transportation to and from school will be 
furn.shed free of charge. One bus leaves 
Navy Yard at 7:00 A.M., proceeds to Dalahi- 
can for children in that area and along route. 
Another bus leaves Navy Yard at 7:20 A.M., 
for children in Cavite, Canacao, and Sangley 
Point areas. 

Medical Examination: All pupils must have 

medical examination. All new puipls report to 
Out Patient Department, Naval Hospital, Ca- 
nacao, Saturday morning June 8, for med cal 
examination. 

Old pupils will be examined at Out Patient 
Department, Naval Hospital, Canacao, by ap- 
pointment with Out Patient Doctor. 

Tuition will be accepted only upon comple- 



A GAIN, bAMbOO auuience, 

greetings from the AMERICAN SHACK 
and there is no reason to call your attention t*> 
the fact that this Club is the fun spot of the 
Philippines. 

With the onset of the rainy season additional 
preparations are being made to increase the re' 
creational facilities of the Club with a view to 
renovating the usual routine to the extent ol 
giving all an opportunity of enjoying a max- 
imum amount of diversion. That is, more and 
better dances are in order — if it is possible to 
improve this phase of entertainment. The mu- 
sicians arc practicing at all hours in an endea- 
vor to bring their repertoire and efficiency up 
to the high standard required by the Club. 
Plans are being made for a tournament of 


tion of all other requirements for registration. 

Beginning Wednesday, June 12, all consult- 
ations of parents with teachers or principal will 
be held after 1:00 P.M. Appointments may 
be made by telephone. Parents who desire to 
observe class room work are welcome at all 
times. 

Pupils must have all available books and ma- 
terials one week after they receive their lists 
of necessary supplies. Parents will please co- 
operate in this respect, so that pupils will not 
be retarded by lack of equipment. 


Acey Ducey and/or Cribbage. The Entertain- 
ment Committee requests all those interested to 
submit their names to the attendant at the serv- 
ice counter. With your kind and prompt co^ 
operation in this regard the plans for the tour- 
nament may be completed at an early date. 

The program for the month of June was 
mailed to the members a few days ago. It 
carr.es a wealth of good fun with the approval 
of each member. A Southern-style chicken din- 
ner is scheduled for Saturday, June 8th; a gala 
barn dance will be the high-litc for the follow- 
ing Saturday at which time the Navy Yard Or^ 
chestra will be featured. This promises to be 
a MUST night at the American Shack so, folks, 
please make your plans accordingly and don’t 
miss this dance of the farmers on the night of 
Saturday, June 15th. Costumes, of course. The 
following Saturday, June 22nd, another big 
dance night is scheduled. Yes! That’s right! 
Two in a row!' Listed as Master of Ceremo- 
nies for the month are: Jimmy Bray, H. G. 
Parks and “Si” Simmonsen. The program for 
the month is concluded with, “Buffet Supper to 
be served by the Ladies' Auxiliary on Satur- 
day evening, June 29th. at 6:30 P.M.” This 
following the supper on this same evening the 
Club Philco will furnish the musical wherewi- 
thal for those who desire to dance. This, 

folks, gives you only the foundation upon which 
the program is builded as there will be games 
every Wednesday night beginning at 7:30 P.M.. 
and, as is usual, one hundred and one miscel- 
laneous entertaining features will present them- 
selves as the month rolls off the calendar. The 
Entertainment Committee welcomes all ideas 


Buy Your Tickets Early 

and avoid last minute rushes if you wish cO 
have an opportunity to win in the draw on 

SUNDAY, JUNE 23, AT 
Santa Ana Park, Manila 

IP P II Z IE S 

ONE BIG PRIZE OF PI 00,000 WATCH FOR THE EXTRA 

1 ^°j d D Prize °c oc nan PRIZES AND HUNDREDS 

1 Third Prize of 25,000 

6 Fourth Prizes at 5,000 OF MINOR PRIZES 

— — . — oOo — < 

TICKETS FOR THE DRAW SEPTEMBER 22 
TO BE ISSUED BEGINNING MONDAY, JUNE 10. 

PRIZES ON A SALE BASIS OF PI, 500, 000 

ONE FIRST PRIZE OF P200.000 

1 Second Prize of 100.009 

1 Third Prize of 50,000 

6 Fourth Prizes at 8,000 

And Hundreds of Minor Prizes 

SAVE A LIFE AND WIN A PRIZE 

PHILIPPINE CPAPITY SWEEPSTAKES 

P. O. Box 141 National Charities Bldg. Manila 




June 7 S 1940 

you might have so please submit to the Com' 
mittee prior to the mailing out of the program 
the first of every month. 

Wednesday night found a fair crowd gatlv 
ered for the Contract Bridge session. An en' 
joyable evening was had by all. High score 
for the evening was: Mrs. W. E. Williams — 
ladies’ high score; “Ski -1 Zukowski — gentle- 
men's high score. Congratulations, winners! 
Mrs. Bob Harris was Hostess for the evening 
a.nd she agrees that the Game nights are occa' 
sions which should be eagerly anticipated. 

It is the policy of the Entertainment Coni' 
mittee to nominate a person, not of the com' 
mittee, to act as Master of Ceremonies for the 
various dance nights. Upon being informed of 
such nomination these persons begin planning 
for the occasion. The result is that a novel 
and cleverly planned evening’s routine is 
worked out. Some of these persons work for 
weeks planning events and they do so with only 
one thought in mind — to give the Members 
and their Guests a well-balanced and good eve> 
ning of fun and dancing. The scheduled Mas' 
ter of Ceremonies for Saturday, June 1st, was 
one of the persons who did just that. Jimmy 
Bray was notified two weeks previous that the 
Committee desired him to take over the cere' 
monial reins for the evening. He, at once, 
went to work planning different novel dances 
that would be greatly enjoyed. He purchased 
prizes for the winners of the planned contests 
and dances, himself, and the success of the 
dance Saturday night may be directly attribut" 
ed to Jimmy although he was unable to person' 
ally handle affairs throughout the evening. He 
turned the physical end over to Ted Brownell 
who did very well in pinch hitting in an en' 
deavor to carry out Jimmy's plans. The eve' 

Luzon Cafe 

SERVE THE BEST 
Drinks and Meals in the City 

CAL & GOOSE— Mgrs. 

305 Echague Manila I 


ning started off with a bang. Tony and his 
orchestra furnished the music(?) and once in a 
while they did hit the same not simultaneously! 
Novel dances were introduced, with a musical 
chair parade being thrown in for good mea- 
sure. The men were the first to start the march 
around the chairs and all went well until there 
were two men left and only one chair. The 
men, Vic Frondorf and A. T. Gillis, were both 
determined to get the seat. However, after 
several sittings that did not prove decisive the 
cups full of cubes were produced and the boys 
got under way. Four sixes seemed to be good 
for Vic but this fellow who cruises around in 
the planes came through with five of the same 
denomination! After they both had a horse 
the bitter fight was on. Ted acted as play' 
by'play announcer and gave everyone a ring' 
side description of what was going on. The 
third horse ran for the aviator and the game 
was over. He was awarded with an appro' 
priate prize for he needed something damp af- 
ter the affair. Next came the ladies with their 
version of the chair parade. Mrs. C. F. John' 
son and Mrs. Beal (the latter a guest) were the 
last two remaining. The music started and 
when it stopped Lou had a slight margin over 
her opponent and was declared the winner. The 
evening was still young and Ted let things go 
on with tag dances for both ladies and gents. 
The next novel dance was a numbers dance 
where you not only had to find a number, but 
also had to guess which one would be lucky. 
The couple who performed this feat perfectly 
was none other than Jimmy and Leona Jami- 
son. They were awarded prizes for their skill 
and guess wor\. Next in l.ne in the way of 
novelties was another jitterbug dance. With 
the jitterbugs going faster than Tony and his 



7 

orchestra could jive, things got off to a good 
start. Ruth Mahan and Ted Brownell and Ski 
Zukowski and Mrs. Lang emerged victorious. 
These four then interchanged partners and the 
show went on. Prizes were awarded all four 
of these energetic dancers. By this time, Tony 
and his boys were out of breath so the Amer' 
ican Shack Orchestra composed of members — 
“Si” Simmonsen, Rose Ferdinand and Ted 
Brownell, furnished some lively tunes. Jimmy 
Jamison vocalized for the new orchestra. The 
evening was getting on so it was decided to 
have an initiation at this time. Mr. H. G. 
Parks, who is chairman of the initiation com' 
mittee, came forth with a very clever method 
of introducing the new members in the Club. 
This phase was enjoyed by everyone present. 
Mr. Parks has many more methods and means 
of introducing new members, so we have much 
to look forward to in the future. Messers. Ja' 
mison, Crayraft, Buschee, Wrigglesworth, Kun' 
dret and Clary were included in this line up. 
You members who have not been put through 
just stand by; your turn is just around the 
corner. The President of the Board of Direc' 
tors, S. F. Ferdinand, took the floor and made 
a few suggestions to the members of the Club 
regarding submitting to the Entertainment Com' 
mittee theY suggestions of entertainment and 
recreation. It is desired that all members sub' 
mit in writing their suggestions prior to the 
printing or forming of the monthly program, 
for after the program is issued the pol.cy is not 
to alter it. The evening was one of much en- 
joyment and the Master of Ceremonies deserves 
much credit. Hostess for the evening was Mrs. 
Bob Harris. “Hoot” Gibson was the host for 
the evening and he was persuaded to make a 
( Continued on page nine ) 

ROSS’ PLACE at Tagaytay 

! 12 to 15 degrees cooler than the 
lowlands — 

45 minutes from Cavite or Manila. 
Transportation in passenger car and 
home-cooked food about P4 per per- 
son — Call up for details (5-27-43 
after 5 p. m.). 

WHERE THE FOOD IS GOOD AND 
THE BEER COLD. 

W. T. DERRICK, Manager. 



Sabater & Co.— Opticians 


Dr. Manuel 
Sabater 
* * * 
Decorated 
By 

His Highness 
MuLai El 
Hasan 


Located for more than 30 years at 
the same building at 76 Escolta (Up- 
stairs) right across from the Lyric 
Theater. Our Advertisement and 
Telephone number (2-23-62) is found 
on every page in every Telephone Di- 
rectory in the Philippines. 

You get the best in life through 
your eyes, why not give them the best 
you can find? We give perfect serv- 
ice in no time, you can buy from us 
with confidence. Sabater & Co. sells 


only the very best materials from 
such renowned firms as the Standard 
Optical, Shuron Optical, Bausch and 
Lomb Optical, American Optical, Op- 
tical Products Corporation, and New- 
port Optical. 

Don’t forget, we are always will- 
ing, ready and able to serve. Re- 
member Dr. Sabater is waiting for 
you at 76 Escolta (Upstairs) 

Manila. 


76 Escolta — Manila 


O- 


Telephone 2-23-62 






8 









Only two panics during the part two weeks 
have kept the Clouters from being idle. Frequent 
rains have been responsible for calling off 
several tilts, and threatening weather has fur 
the most part been responsible for the hesita- 
tion in making matches. 

One week ego on Sunday the Clouters in- 
vaded the Hcacock diamond and tangled with 
the Hcacock Manager’s team. The local lads 
had the situation well in hand from the open- 
ning pitch unt.l the last out was called. Ander- 
son, lead off man for the local team, banged out 
a single to start off an inning that the opposi- 
tion had a hard time stopping. Anderson had 
again been at the plate and found the pitcher 
for another hit in the initial frame before the 
Clouter' s assault was checked, ten runs having 
crossed the plate, as the Managers tasted a hit 
of true Canacao fight. This assault resembled 
somewhat the German Blitzkreig as the Clouters 
continued to gang awa-y at the opening frame. 
Summary: Clouters — 15 hits, 13 runs, and 2 
errors. Managers — 6 hits, 4 runs, and 8 
errors. 

* 

Memorial Day featured a game for the chanv 
pionship of Cavite, for which a trophy was pro* 
sented to the winner by the Cavite fiesta asso- 
ciation. The pick of the Cavite teams was 
gathered at the Cavite High School grounds, de- 
termined to soundly trounce the local lads for 
the championship, hut the Clouters had a dif- 
ferent idea and the result was one of the linest 
exhibitions of Clouter talent ever witnessed. The 
highlight of the Clouter offense was the power- 
packed hatting led by Thomson, veteran catcher, 
who lost the ball in the distant left field for a 
home run bringing two of hs mates home ahead 
of him. The defense was led by Boh Campbell, 
ace Clouter pitcher, who held the All Stars to 
one scratch single, which was made in the last 



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Clothes & Uniforms made to Order. 

Work 

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TRY US FOR COMPLETE 
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58 XIII Martires St. 


Cavite, Cavite 


CANACAO yachting 
ASSOCIATION 

The Board of Managers of the Canacao 
Yatching Association (A-hem!) announce, with 
pleasure, the return of their President, Lieut- 
enant (jg) C. R. Beaman (SC) USN, after 
I having spent a pleasant vacation in China ports. 
Also, it has been reported that Gunner Her- 
bert E. Anderson, Jr., USN, is about to launch 
another stream-lined craft. It is not known, 
however, whether or not a public invitation will 
be extended for the launching. More informa- 
tion will be forthcoming at a later date. 

frame with two men out. It looked very much 
like a no-hit no-run game for Bob during the 
first six innings, and the scratch single was a 
great disappointment, however, the boys were 
jub.lant over the victory and the loss of the re- 
cord was not felt. After the game the victori- 
ous Clouters were presented with the trophy. It 
was placed on the trophy locker in plain view, 
so that the Clouter following could view the ac- 
complishment of the Clouters' string of victories, 
Mr. Kelley, athletic officer, made the an- 
nouncement this week that the Clouters were 
entered into competition with seven other teams 
in the local Cavite league. It is interesting also 
to note that the Clouters’ closest rivals, the Ra- 
dio School, are also entered in this race for the 
League championship. Each team will play a 
total of fifty-six games during the tournament 
so there should he ample opportunity for tho-c 
fans who have not seen the Clouters in action 
to w.tness some of the finest softball in this 
part of the Islands. As yet no schedule has been 
handed me hut when it is I'll give it to you fans 
so you can arrange your time accordingly. 

gleahihgs 

Cigars were the order of the day as three 
men proudly displayed the buttons for the first 
time. Congratulations to Flowers, Ferdinand, 
and Rhodes and thanks for the cigars. 

o 

H usband : “I have left instructions in my 
will that I am to be cremated.” 

Wile: ”Ycs, just like you to go and leave 
ashes all over the place.” 

Small daughter: (After hanging up receiver 
in unsuccessful to get her Daddy on the other 
end of the wire) “Dere’s jus’ no use, Mommy, 
they don’t understand me. I spose I'm jus 

Enjoy the charm of 
“OLD EUROPE” 
and visit the 

GERMAN RESTAURANT 

239 Isaac Peral, Manila 
Specialties: 

Wiener Schnitzel, 

Tenderloin steak. 

Pig-knuckles, etc. 

Ice-cold Draught, German 
and Pabst Beer. 


BOWLING SEASON OPENING 
JULY 1st 

All activities of the Sixteenth Naval District 
are invited to represent themselves when the 
Bowling Season opens on July 1st. 

Make this a better season than ever. Select 
your players and a team captain and submit a 
list to Machinist R. M. Reed, USN, Production 
Office, Navy Yard. The month of June should 
be used to eliminate your players and pick a top 
team. Teams will consist of five players and as 
many substitutes as needed. 

o 

SWIMMING INSTRUCTIONS 

Beginning Monday, June 10th, Mrs. N. A. 
MacLeod who is a competent swimming instruc- 
tor will conduct swimming classes as well as 
g.ve individual swimming instructions according 
to the following schedule: 

Women beginners 

Women (advanced) 

Children (5-12) 

Children (adv. 5-12) 


7^o. in 



Class : 

No. of Lessionss 

Price : 

5 

10 

P2.50 

5 

5 or 10 

PI. 50 — P2.50 

10 

10 

P2.00 

10 

5 or 10 

PI. 25 — P2.00 

(Note: 

Classes will be of 

50 minutes duration 


and all classes will be conducted in the morn- 
ings. Individual instruction P0.50 per lesson 
of 30 minutes duration. Individual for scries of 
ten lessons of 30 minutes duration each, P4.00. 

School children 2:00 to 3:30 P. M., by ap- 
pointment. 

ALL CLASSES & LESSONS BY AP- 
POINTMENT. Appointments may he made 
with Mrs. MacLeod at the Navy Yard Swim- 
ming Pool or with the Life Guard at Canacao 
Swimming Pool. 

RESULTS GUARANTEED 
o 

Wife — ”1 didn't like that new secretary of 
yours, so I discharged her this morning.” 
Husband — “Before giving her a chance?” 
Wife — “No, before giving you a chance!” 

The old narrow trails where two cars could 
barely pass without colliding are happily being 
replaced by splendid wide highways on which 
six or eight cars can collide at one time. 

getting Pan American!” 

AH l\CC 

(Army-Navy Tailoring) 

76-78 Real St. Wailed City. Manila 

The House of . . . 

• QUALITY, 

• DURABILITY, 

• STYLE. 



June 7 , 1940 


9 



THE LARGEST CABARET IIS THE WORLD 



THERE’S NO BETTER PLACE TO SPEND A PLEASANT EVENING 


One of the favorite 
playgrounds of socia- 
lites and celebrities. 

Famous for spaghetti 
dinners, served in the 
best Italian tradition. 


Dance music by Vic 
Hernandez, the Trum- 
pet King and his 
Santa Ana Cabaret 
Swingsationals. 

Very popular band 
with the young social 
crowd. 


AMERICAN SHACK BRIEFS 

(Continued from page seven ) 
little talk — something which is very rare for 
“Gibby.” “Hoot' explained his duty so far as 
the By'Laws were concerned, that is, the music 
would stop at 1:00 A.M., the bar would close 
at 1:30 A.M., and the Club would close at 2:00 
A.M. “Hoot” was in a merry mood for he 
had been very lucky all evening. “Scrub'’ 
Wash could not get to first base with him, but 
“Scrub” really found plenty of competition with 
Johnnie Yelinko. They kept the boxes rattling 
for hours when finally they took home those 
three cigars that originally were owned by C. 
F. Johnson. Ruth Gibson sang “St. Louis 
Blues'’ for her share of the entertainment. The 
American Shack Orchestra once again took over 
for a short while. Johnnie Yelinko (The 
TULSA songbird) sang “Pagan Love Song” 
and Bob Harris rendered “My Little Grass 
Shack.” These numbers were very much en' 
joyed by all. 

The spirit of good fellowship and fun pre* 
vailed throughout the evening. Guests were: 
Mr. and Mrs. Beal; Mr. and Mrs. Alpaug!:. 
Miss Rosalie Douglas, Mrs. Doblir and Mr. 
James A. Jones. So ended a delightful eve* 
ning. 

InWARREN D. SARGEANT 

DOCTOR OF DENTAL SURGERY 
Room 630 — Heacock Bldg. 

Escolta Manila 

Phone 2-11-76 for Appointment 


SERVICE TO THE SERVICE 

FOR SALE: One Radio phonograph com- 

bination, etc. with antennae. Cabinet has good 
finish. P65.00. Call 129. 

FOR SALE: One Hotpoint electric stove, 

has side oven, three burners, thermostat con* 
trol, 220v. Telephone 708'B. 

WANTED: A collapsible canvas, baby 

carriage. Mrs. T. G. Wild. 6 Brisa Mar Court, 
Canacao, or telephone 72 LA. 

FOR SALE: Willy's '37, four'door sedan. 

Economical to operate. Car in good condition. 
F800.00. Apply M. Robertson, Industrial De- 
partment, Navy Yard. 

FOR SALE: 1937 Plymouth Coupe, mileage 
18,000 miles. Car equipped with radio. Apply 
Lieutenant Commander Hastings. Telephone 
155 or 723'A. 

LOST! Black onyx setting from ring. Dia' 
mond inset in onyx. Finder please notify 
District Chaplain. 

FOR SALE: Oakland — 1931 Sedan, motor 

in excellent condition (12 miles per gallon), 
body in fair condition. Quick sale P100.00. 

Saturday, June 8th, “Fried Chicken Dinner” 
is scheduled and that is what it is going to be. 
Dinner will be served at 7:00 P.M., after which 
Bingo will be played until 10:30 P.M. The 
Philco will furnish music, then, for dancing un- 
til closing time. 

There will be a regular meeting of the Board 
of Directors at 4:45 P.M., Friday, June 7th, at 
the American Shack. 

— An American Shac\er. 


Apply telephone 157. 

FOR SALE: 1939 Ford Coupe, mileage 5800. 
Apply Dr. Perez, office phone 50, home phone 
81. 

FOUND! One white gold ring. Owner 
may inquire in office of District Chaplain. 

SERVANT WANTED: Chinese cook.. Apply 
Labor Board, Navy Yard. 

WANTED: Used portable typewriter, stand' 

ard keyboard, good condition, reasonably priced . 
Apply Chaplain's Office, telephone 129. 

AVAILABLE: Excellent Chinese amah, 

available since May 31. Capable of caring 
for new baby or older children. I can cheer' 
fully recommend her to anyone desiring a Chin' 
ese amah. Captain R. T. Gants, (MC), USA, 
Sternberg Hospital, Manila. 

FOR SALE: One Iver Johnson Bicycle. In' 
quire or call 703'A, 8 Canacao Blvd, Canacao, 
Cavite. 

FOR SALE: One five piece set of rattan 

furniture reasonably priced. Apply telephone 
525 during working hours and 714'A after 
4:00 P.M., daily. 

Commuters! A vacancy exists in the “Pasay 
Cl pper’s” crew. Anyone interested in making 
the trip from Pasay to Cavite daily should call 
Derrick. Telephone 157. 


BE WISE 
ALKALIZE 

with 

ALKA-SELTZER 




10 


RED CROSS MEETINGS 

Dr. Joaquin Canuto of the Red Cross in Ma- 
nila is in charge of first aid classes composed of 
thirty-two Naval officers' wives and daughters. 

Classes will meet on Wednesday and Friday 
of each week from 8:30 until 10:30 A.M., and 
all the members are taking a great deal of inter- 
est in this most important work. 

An announcement is made that beginning 
Friday, June 7th, Dr. Canuto will conduct a 
second class in first aid work on Wednesday 
and Friday afternoons of each week from one 
to three o'clock. 

o 

BITS OF BIOGRAPHY 

Parents should not become too perturbed 
when their young hopefuls shy at practicing 
their music lessons. No less a musician than 
Walter Damrosch was not always musically in- 
clined. In fact, he considered music as much 
a drudge as does the average boy of today. 

When he was eight years old, the Franco 
Prussian war began and little Walter received 
the exciting and welcome news that his piano 
teacher had been drafted for war service. No 
more music, thought Walter. But the lad, who 
was later to conduct the New York Symphony 
Orchestra, was not happy long for he says, “My 
hopes were rudely dashed when a bald headed 
substitute /appeared to continue the lessons." 


“What did the undertaker say when the cof- 
fin fell out of the car?" 

“We'll have to rehearse thatiL" 


TAU OMICRON PHI SORORITY 

Theta, local Cavite-Manila chapter of Tau 
Omicron Phi, National Service Society, is plan- 
ning another of its entertainments in the 
Army and Navy Club in Manila, to allow for a 
greater attendance. It will be remembered 
that last fall this chapter contributed Pi 5x00 to 
Navy Relief (proceeds of a benefit game night 
at the Sangley Point Officers* Club), and re- 
cently has donated P30.00 to the American 
Guardian Association. 

The society climaxed its spring rushing and 
pledging with the initiation ol seven new 
girls . . . Katherine Bach, Betty Bach, Ruth 
Johnson, Evelyn Lindenmayer, Susanne Linden- 
mayer, Ellen McCall, and Zoe Whitney. 

For a time, T.O.P. roll call dropped low wJth 
the loss of charter member Betty McMullin and 
pledge Abbie Dora Ansel to the States; to 
China, president Ann Smeallie, secretary Doriss 
Helmkamp, and visiting T. O. P., Betty Damon. 
Initiate Kay Bach, like the first two, has left 
permanently for the States recently. 

o 

Father: “Isn’t it wonderful how little chicks 
get out of their shells?'* 

Son: “What gets me is how they get in!” 

— Exchange. 

o 

“May I hold your Palm Olive?'* 

“Not on your Life Buoy.'' 

“Then I’m out of Lux?'' 

“Yes, Ivory formed.” 

— Selected. 


BAMBOO BREEZES 
YMCA PROGRAM 

FROM JUNE 8th. TO JUNE 15th., 1940 

W elcome to new arrivals on U . S . A . T . 
“GRANT” All new men presented w.th P2.00 
monthly physical privilege ticket free. Call for 
yours at the “Y”. 

* 

IX THE CLUB ROOM 
SUNDAY. JUNE 9th. 

9:00 A.M.- JAVA CLUB — Discussion: 

“CHISELING" — Mr. C. M. 
Lewis, Leader. 

10:00 A.M — CHURCH PARTIES — Trans- 
portation furnished. 

MONDAY, JUNE 10th. 

7:00 P.M. TOASTMASTER'S CLUB. 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12th. 

7:00 P.M— WEDNESDAY “Y” 'S UP— 
Another interesting series of po- 
pular talks by Col. O. J. Cohee 
FRIDAY, JUNE 14th. 

7:00 P.M.— TRIANGLE SERVICE LEA- 
GUE. 

8:00 P.M.—' TROPIC CAMERA CLUB. 

* 

IH the physical department 

EVERY MONDAY, WEDNESDAY 
£? FRIDAY 

9-11 A.M. Ladies Health Class, Volleyball, 
Calisthenics, Badminton and Swim- 
ming. 

4-6 P.M. Badminton — Ladies and Gentlemen. 

TUESDAY 6? FRIDAY 
8:00 P.M.— JIU-JITSU CLASS — Mr. D. E. 
Muggy, Instructor. 


\ v The Rains Came! A\ \ 

A\ ' x x 

The rains will probably 
continue to dampen your 
spirit and body* Select an 
attractive rain coat or uin- 

\ 

brella from our complete 
stock today and you "Won't 
Be So Blue When It Rains! 




SHIP’S SERVICE STORE 


FREE DELIVERY 


NAVY YARD, CAVITE, P. 1. 


PHONE 173 



11 


June 7, 1940 


8:00 P.M. FENCING CLASS— Cpl. Ralph 
Rapp, Instructor 
SUNDAY 

J 7:00 P.M. JIU-JITSU 

C * 

§ IN the lobby 

SATURDAY 

£ 6:30 P.M. Saturday Night Smg song 

■£ TUESDAY 

7:00 P.M. Chess Players’ Night 


g IN THE PATIO 

> SUNDAY 

5:15 P.M. Sing Song 
g 5:45 P.M. Fellowship Session 

£ * 

£ TRIANGLE SERVICE LEAGUE 

^ “BIENVENIDA" (WELCOME) PARTY FOR 
I HEW COMERS 

FRIDAY, JUNE 7th, at 6:30 P.M. 
SWIM, FELLOWSHIP, REFRESHMENTS, 
ETC. 


* 


V 

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d 

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CD 


u 

-o 


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KEEP IN MIND THE 
PASIG RIVER BOAT TRIP 
SATURDAY, JUNE 8th., 1940. 
AND THE 

AMATEUR RADIO BROADCAST 
TUESDAY, JUNE 11th, 1940. 

AT 8:45 P. M. 

NEW MEN OF MANILA AREA 
A SPECIAL PROGRAM FOR YOU! 
SATURDAY, JUNE 8, 1940—8:00 P.M. 

ARMY 6s? NAVY “Y” LOBBY 
ENTERTAINMENT & REFRESHMENTS 
COME AND GET ACQUAINTED 


‘‘Doesn’t that mule ever kick you?” 

‘‘No, sah, he ain’t yet, but he frequently 
kicks dc place where ah recently was.” 



SUNDAY, 9 JUNE, 1940 
THIRD SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY 

o 

PROTESTANT 

9:15 A M. SUNDAY SCHOOL in the 
Movie Theatre, Naval Hospital, Ca* 
nacao 

10:15 A. M.— MORNING PRAYER in the 
Chapel, Naval Hospital, Canacao 

Chaplain R. W. Faid\. U.S.N-. Offi • 
dating 

Sermon Topic: ‘'LIGHT FOR MEN ” 

HOLY COMMUNION on the first 
Sunday of each qjonth 

6:45 P.M.—' VESPERS SERVICE 
Marine Barracks 

Service Conducted by Chaplain Faull{. 
ROMAN CATHOLIC 

9:30 A.M, — Mass in the Chapel, Naval 
Hospital Canacao 

The Reverend Father Peter Lerena, 
Pro., Celebrant 

9:15 A.M. — Sunday School in the Academy 
of the Sacred Heart, opposite Navy 
Plasa, Cavite. 

BM: “Why does that dog sit there and stare 

at me when I'm eating?” 

Messcook: “You’re using the plate he usuaL 

ly eats from.’ 

o 

Cowboy: “My partner and I are taking a 
trip through the desert next week. He’s ta.k' 
ing along a gallon of whiskey for rattlesnake 
bites.’ 

Dude: “And what are you taking along?” 

Cowboy: “A couple of rattlesnakes.” 


TJ 

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CO 


For Complete 

OFFICERS & C. P. O. 

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12 


BAMBOO BREEZES 


REENLISTMENT ALLOWANCE 

Statement of Captain E. G. Allen, USN., 
Budget Officer of the Navy Department, before 
the House Appropriations Committee, relative 
to payment of reenlistment allowance: 

During the economy years, the payment ot 
reenlistment gratuities was suspended, along 
with other suspensions and reductions in pay 
by the economy laws. Subsequently, a specific 
provision was inserted in appropriation bills 
for the fiscal years 1938 and 1939 prohibiting 
the expend. ture of funds appropriated to the 
Navy for the payment of reenlistment gratui' 
ties. No such prohibition was placed in any 
of the 1940 appropriation acts, the House hav- 
ing rejected them on the floor. Therefore, re* 
enlistment gratuities arc being paid in the fiscal 
year 1940. The status of suits by ind.viduals 
to recover money in accordance with the statute 
is covered by the following statement: 

“Cases involving suits for enlistment allow' 
ancc in the fiscal years 1936, 1938, and 1939 
were recently decided in the Court of Claims 
and in the United States District Court for the 
Eastern District of New York. An enlisted 
man in the Navy filed suit in the latter court 
claiming enlistment allowance for his reenlist' 
ment in October 1935, and also for his re- 
enlistment in 1938. The enlistment allowance 
was originally suspended beginning in the fiscal 
years 1934 by the Act of March 3, 1933, as 
follows: ‘So much of sections 9 and 10 of the 
act entitled: “An Act to readjust the pay and 
allowances of the commissioned and enlisted 
personnel of the Army. Navy. Marine Corps, 
Coast Guard, Coast and Geodetic Survey, and 
Public Health Service” approved June 10, 1922 
(U.S.C. title 37, secs. 12 and 26), as provides 
for the payment of enlistment allowance to en- 
listed men for reenlistment within a period of 
3 months from date of discharge is hereby sus' 
pended as to reelistment made during the fiscal 

Silverton’s Dry Cleaning 
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FIRST CLASS DRY CLEANERS 

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50 centavos per month. 

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PHONE 2-42-73 


year ending June 30, 1934. 

“This provision was reenacted tor the fiscal 
years 1935, 1936, and 1937. 

“For the fiscal years 1938 and 1939 the sus' 
pension of enlistment allowance was made in 
the following: 

“No part of any appropriation contained in 
this or other act for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1938, shall be available for the payment of 
enlistment allowance to enlisted men for re- 
enlistment w.thin a period of 3 months from 
date of discharge as to reenlistment made dur- 
ing the fiscal year ending June 30, 1938, not- 
withstanding the applicable provisions of sec- 
tions 9 and 10 of the act entitled “An act to 
readjust the pay and allowances of the commis- 
sioned and enlisted personnel of the Army, 
Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, Coast and 
Geodetic Survey, and Public Health Service,” 
approved June 10, 1922 (U.S.C, Title 37, sec*. 
13 and 16).'” 

The United States District Court for the 
Eastern District of New York in the case of 
Earl DeWayne Brooks, decided on November 
2, 1939, that under the language of the law 
the man was not entitled to enlistment allow- 
ance either for his reenlistment occuring in 1935 
or for the reenlistment ocurring in 1938. 

The Court of Claims on November 6, 1939, 
decided that case of Emmett F. Dickerson, an 
enlisted man in the Army who claimed enlist- 
ment allowance for his reenlistment on July 22, 
1938. The Court of Claims in the Dickerson 
case granted judgment in favor of the man. 
It is possible thait either of these cases may be 
appealed to a higher court. The Government 
has 90 days in which to request a review by 
the Supreme Court of the United States of the 
Court of Claims case. While no definite in- 
formation is obtainable at this time, it may be 
that the Department of Justice will seek a re- 
view by the Supreme Court of the United States 
of the Dickerson case, especially in view of the 
conflicting court decisions on this subject. Re- 
gardless of the outcome of these cases no pay- 
ments of enlistment allowance for the fiscal 
years 1934 to 1939, inclusive, may be made 
by any disbursing officer. Pending an official 
judicial decision of this matter by a higher 
court ,it will serve no purpose for enlisted men 
to submit claims to the General Accounting Of- 
fice. 

King and King, on 8 March, 1940, asked the 
Supreme Court not to grant the writ of cer- 
tiorari sought by the Department of Justice in 
the reenlistment allowance case of Dickerson. 
It will be recalled that the Department of Just- 
ice had asked the Supreme Court to grant a writ 
for the reconsideration of the case in chc high- 
er court. Attorneys for the plaintiff contend 
that the conclusions of the Court of Cla/'ms arc 
sound, that the reenlistment allowance for years 
1938-1939 should be paid, and that Dickerson 
case should not be reconsidered. 

The highest court of the land has granted the 
petition of the government, and, in all prob 
ability, it will hear arguments in the premises 
during the present Supreme Court session. 

— 2sJ aval Affairs — May. 1940. 


PORTA - VAGA 

From reliable sources, I am giving below the 
real meaning of the word “PORTA-VAGA” 
the last part of which is now used for the ex- 
Array tug General Wee\s (now USS VAGA). 

The Spanish word PORTA is a contraction 
of the correct Spanish word PUERTA which 
means in English door. The word PORTA had 
been used to shorten the correct word PUER 
TA. 

The word VAGA is the adjective ot the 
noun VAGA (in the singular case) or VA- 
GAS (in the plural ca>e), which mean* in Eng- 
lish vagahoTid or vagabonds as the case may be. 
The complete name first adopted by the Span- 
ish Government for this gate was PUERTA 
DE LOS VAGOS (door of the vagabonds), 
and later on contracted to read PORTA-VAGA 
VAGA was used instead of VAGO in the 
masculine gender, it would be incorrect to in- 
terlace these two words hence, to make this 
compound word correct the feminine gender of 
VAGO was used which is VAGA. 

The reason why the Spanish Government 
named this gate as such, is explained as fol- 
lows: 

During the regime of said Government, Ca- 
vite had been populated with a number of bad 
elements, devised the means of constructing a 
wall with a single door in order to exclude these 
elements from the City of Cavite. Only per- 
sons bearing identification cards to show that 
they were of good standing and others to show 
that they were employees of the yard were ad- 
mitted thru this gate. 

—BAMBOO BREEZES. 19 Se P t. 1931. 
o 

Dr.: “Be sure and take a bath before you re- 
tire but not until you do.” 

Chief: “But Doctor, I have three years to 
do!” 

— Selected. 


MONOGRAM PINS 
ANIMAL BROOCHES 
MOTHER-OF-PEARL . . . 

Salad Plates, Spoons, Forks, Bowls, 


and many other Novelties 
& Fancy Shells 
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MANILA BUTTON FACTORY 

460 DASMAttlftAS TEL. 2-I6-3S 



June 7, 1940 


13 


SENSE N’ 

A newly created paper received the follow' 
ing glad tidings in a telegram: 

“Hazel gave birth to a little girl this morn' 
ing: both are do.ng well/' 

On the message was a sticker reading: 

“When you want a boy call Western Union." 
o 

Mr. Blinks was busily engaged with a spade 
in the mud beside his car when a stranger hailed 
him. 

“Stuck in the mud?” he asked. 

“Oh, no/’ 

“My engine died here and I'm digging a 
grave for it". 

o 

Wife: “I want you to match this piece of 

silk for me during the noon lunch hour, and 
get another half a yard for me.” 

Husband: “At that counter where that sweet 

little blond works — the one with those soft eyes, 
that gorgeous smile, those kissable lips, that — /’ 

Wife: “No, dearest; I'm afraid you won’t 

have time. I'll do it myself”. 

o 

“What is a little Eskimo with a frozen 
finger?” 

“I don’t know. What?” 

“He's a frigid midget with a rigid digit.” 

o 

FOOTBALL Inflated, leather covered object 


NONSENSE 

thrown through the air or carried under the 
arm, not round like a ball, and the foot is 
seldom used to propel it, hence the name. 

o 

LIPSTICK— That which a girl hastily applies 
when surrounded by a group of men, but quick- 
ly removes when with one. 

CHIROPRACTOR — A guy who gets paid 
for doing what you or I would get slapped for. 

Life is like an automobile. It may run slow, 
medium or fast, depending on the will of the 
driver. 

A man's thoughts are like unto an elevator. 
They can either lift him or lower him. 

Hardship is a stern school for the young, 
but luxury can wreck far more lives. 

Man is the only animal that God permitted 
the power of smiles or tears. The resort to 
either proves his humanity. 

o 

A man went into bowling alley one time 
and got into a game with one of the other men 
who also frequented the place. At the end of 
the game it was found that he had bowled 9 
strikes, with a net score of 129. It was estab- 
lished that he did not roll any balls down the 
gutter, nor did any of the balls rolled leave 
the alley except at the end, and into the pit. 
How did he do it? 


THE GREAT SEAL 

On June 20, 1782, The Congress adopted the 
present Great Seal of the United States. In 
selecting the coat of arms for the seal, Congress 
rejected the figures of beavers, rattlesnakes, pine 
trees, anchors, and other designs which were 
popular during the Revolutionary War, and 
adopted the bald eagle as a symbol of strength 
and freedom. 

In one talon the eagle holds thirteen arrows 
representing the states’ readiness for war, and 
in the other talon is an olive branch with 
thirteen leaves as a symbol of the states’ desire 
for peace. On the eagle's breast is a shield 
with a blue field and thirteen red and white 
stripes. Over the eagles head are thirteen stars 
bursting thru the clouds. 

It was intended that the national coat of arms 
would find popular use in the same way as the 
flag. This was true at first; but gradually the 
'Great Seal was used more and more for official 
purposes only, and the eagle alone became popu' 
lar in art and literature as the symbol of the 
United States. 

o 

“Jane/ said the mother sorrowfully, “every 
time you are naughty I get an other gray hair.” 

“My word,” replied Jane, “y° u must have 
been a terror. Look at Grandma.’ 

Exchange. 


SHIP’S SERVICE STORE 

— U. S. Naval Hospital-Canacao — 

CANDIES, TOBACCO, TOILET ART- 
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Developing & Printing, Hosiery, Tennis 
Shoes & Shorts, Oiled Silk Raincoats. 
oOo 

SODA FOUNTAIN SERVICE 
ICE CREAM, l/ 2 P int f0 - 30 — Pint P0 - 50 
Quart P0.90 — Gallon P2.80 

0 O 0 

BOWLING ALLEYS POOL TABLES 
LAUNDRY — BARBER — TAILOR 

0 O 0 

FREE DELIVERY SERVICE TO CANA- 
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RADIO ROAD TO GANGLEY BRIDGE. 

PHONE 90 



T IH E <0 IR iC ii/NI A IL 
OLD ToNiCAL BRANDY 

'THE ARI/ToCRAT' 

BY IT7 OWN MERIT./ 



14 


BAMBOO BREEZES 



Fri. June 7 
Sat. „ 8 

Sun. „ 9 

Mon. „ 10 

Tues. „ 11 

Wed. „ 12 

Thur. „ 13 

Fri. „ 14 


RECEIVING STATION 

7:30 every night 

BULLDOG DRUMMOND IN AFRICA, 
(Para.) 

John Howard, Heather Angel. 

HE COULDN’T SAY NO, (Vit.) 

Frank McHugh, Jane Wyman. 


A YANK AT OXFORD, (M.G.M.) 
Robert Taylor, Maureen O’Sullivan. 

SAN QUENTIN, (Vit.) 

Pat. O’Brien, Ann Sheridan. 

The Grand Bounce, (Pete Smith Special' 
ty) 

SPECIAL SHOW 

(Adm. P0.15— Starts 8:00 P.M.) 

SONS OF THE LEGION, (Para.) 

Lynne Overman, Evelyn Keeys. 
WIFE OF GENERAL LING, (G-B) 

Griffith Jones, Inkijinoff, Adrianne 
Reen. 

LITTLE MISS BROADWAY, (Fox) 
Shirley Temple, George Murphy 


NAVAL HOSPITAL 

7:30 P.M. every night 
THE LADY OBJECTS, (Col.) 

Lanny Ross, Gloria Stuart. 

SONS OF THE LEGION, (Para.) 
Lynne Overman, Evelyn Keeys. 

WIFE OF GENEP.AL LING, (G-B) 
Griffith Jones, Inkijinoff, Adrianne 
Reen. 

HE COULDN’T SAY NO, (Vit.) 

Frank McHugh, Jane Wyman. 


SPECIAL SHOW 

Adm. P0.15 — Starts 7:00 P.M. 

A YANK AT OXFORD, (M.G.M.) 

Robert Taylor, Maureen O'Sullivan. 
SAN QUENTIN, (Vit.) 

Pat. O’Brien, Ann Sheridan. 

The Grand Bounce, (Pete Smith Special- 

ty) 

STRANGE BORDERS, (G.B.) 

Lilli Palmer, Renee St. Cyr. 


MARINE BARRACKS 

7:45 P.M. every night 
RENEGADE RANGER, (R.K.O.), 
George O’Brien, Rita Hayworth. 

SAN QUENTIN, (Vit.) 

Pat. O’Brien, Ann Sheridan. 

The Grand Bounce, (Pete Smith Special- 

ty) 

THE AWFUL TRUTH, (Col.) 

Irene Dunne, Cary Grant. 

SONS OF THE LEGION, (Para.) 

Lynne Overman, Evelyn Keeys. 

WIFE OF GENERAL LING, (G-B) 
Griffith Jones, Inkijinoff, Adrianne 
Reen. 

NOTHING SACRED, (U. Artists) 
Carole Lombard, F. March. 

HE COULDN’T SAY NO, (Vit.) 

Frank McHugh, Jane Wyman. 

A YANK AT OXFORD, (M.G.M.) 
Robert Taylor, Maureen O'Sullivan. 


CAMBCC 

IBIEIEIEZES 

June 7, 1940 

Vol. XIV No. 18 

Weekly news magazine of the Six- 
teenth Naval District and the U. S. Navy 
Yard, Cavite, P. I., issued by authority of 
Rear Admiral John Morris Smeallie, USN, 
Commandant. 

Published every Friday and distributed to 
the personnel of the United States Navy 
and Marine Corps in the Philippines and the 
ships of the U.S. Asiatic Fleet free of charge. 

Copies mailed direct to any local or Unit- 
ed States address for fifty centavos per 
quarter — payable in advance. 

Edited by Chaplain Roland W. Faulk, 
Comdr. E. L. Gayhart, T. R. Brownell, Y lc, 
and Mr. F. W. Simmonsen. 

Business and Advertising Manager — Lt. 
J. L. Welch U.S.N. Advertising Represen- 
tative — Mr. A. Hokson. 

Printed by Benipayo Press, 550 Miseri- 
cordia, Manila. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post 
Office, Cavite, P. I., 3 July, 1930. 

Advertising rate from P20.00 per page 
to Pi. 00 per column inch per issue. Dis- 
counts granted on long term contracts. 


DISTRICT ATHLETICS 

At a meeting of the 
proposed District Athletic 
Committee on Wednes- 
day, June 5th, plans for 
the coming fiscal year 
were outlined and dis- 
cussed. Lieutenant Com- 
mander W. S. Kurtz 
(CC) USN, who has 
been designated District 
Athletic Officer for the coming year pre- 
sided at the meeting. Representatives of all 
units in the district were present and members 
of the various committees for the separate spoit? 
were nominated. The sentiment of this meet- 
ing was that of whole-hearted cooperation with 
the Athletic Officer. Plans for the coming 
year provide for a well-rounded athletic pro- 
gram in the District, wherein as many indivi- 
duals as desire to may be able to engage in his 
favorite sport... 

On an isolated station such as this, athletics 
play no small part in providing recreation and 
a well-rounded program will do a lot towards 
increasing the happiness and contentment of all 
who live here. Athletics provide an outlet for 
energy in this place where an active life has 
been proven to be far better than a relatively 
inactive one. A good athletic program will be 
an ideal means of passing the time in a pleas- 
ant as well as profitable fashion. 

One new feature of the plans for athletics 
is the appointment of committees to handle the 


affairs of the separate sports. In previous 
years the responsibilities for these sports were 
carried by a few. Next year, with committees 
at work, this combined effort and enthusiasm 
will do much to increase the interest in these 
sports, it is expected that Athletics in the Dis- 
trict will reach an all-time high. 

In order to have an athletic program accom- 
plish its intended purpose, cooperation from all 
hands is a requirement. Few, if any, indivi- 
duals are so burdened with duties that they 
cannot find time to participate in some sport. 
And the success of any game does not require 
a team of experts. As a point in case, consider 
chat the most popular sport in the United States 
today is not baseball, golf, boxing or football. 
It is Softball. One reason for this is that in 
order to be a player a person does not have 
to go in for heavy training and become expert 
at it. He can have a tremendous amount of 
fun just in the playing of the game. So it 
should be here in this District. The purpose 
of the Athletic program is not to break any 
world’s records, but to provide an outlet for the 
enjoyment of life while here. 

One record we could shoot at. We could 
aim at having one hundred per cent participa- 
tion of the personnel here in one or more of the 
sports which will be carried on during the 
course of a year. If that is not possible, we 
might aim at another — we might aim at having 
one hundred per cent cooperation from every 
man in the District. With that, the best ath- 
letic program in the history of the District 
would be assured. — R. W. F. 



June 7 , 1940 


15 



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"Benipayo Press”, — Manila.